How to keep yellows bright in fall aspen tree foliage

"Autumn Showcase"  Plein Air Oil on Board  12x9
“Autumn Showcase” Plein Air Oil on Board 12×9

How to keep yellows bright in fall aspen tree foliage

Autumn Showcase was painted in front of our house in Colorado. I changed the background and singled out three trees and went to work! It will be one of my submissions for Plein Air Southwest Salon (PASW) at Southwest Gallery in Dallas, TX, beginning April 11, 2015.

On a sunny day, I try to keep my yellows as bright as possible, because that is the way I see them on sunlit fall aspen trees. To do this, I use three yellows in varying combinations: cadmium lemon, cadmium yellow medium and Indian yellow. On the beginning block-in and first layer after that, I do NOT add any white. At the very end, and only for the most sunlit leaves, I add a tiny bit of white to this mixture. Too much white changes the color of the bright yellows and makes the paint have a chalky look.

What about edges of the foliage?
What about edges of the foliage?

The sharpest edges should be kept around the center of interest, in this case the largest tree out in front. Most of them, not all of them, should be softened as the foliage goes away from the center of interest. It’s kind of like a camera focusing on something and the rest of the picture is a little blurry. To do this is easy if you’re painting plein air – you can just put down the color and with one brush stroke, sweep the color out into the background while it is wet. (Click on the image to enlarge). Stay tuned for next blog, how I mix the yellows in shadow. Feel free to pass this on to a friend and tell them they may email me at cecy@cecyturner.com to receive notifications of posts, or they may leave a comment on my blog. Thanks for tuning in, and Happy New Year!