How Do I Handle Summer Greens in Aspen Foliage?

How Do I Handle Summer Greens in Aspen Foliage?

Plein Air Oil
“Summer’s Promise”                                                   Plein Air Oil

Since greens are “in” now, I thought I’d discuss a little about them, since everyone seems to have trouble with them. Aspen trees have cooler green foliage than most other trees, so I usually mix greens using a cool blue like cerulean blue with any yellow (usually a cool one) plus a TOUCH of cool red (this always grays the green just slightly to make the green more believable and natural). Notice the dark greens in the foliage “weave” through in a sideways S shape from the right of the largest aspen up to the top of the second largest aspen. This keeps the darks connected in a good shape and they don’t appear spotty. You can add other darks here and there, but always have a large, connected shape first. Click on the image to enlarge it.

When adding lighter green foliage in oil, be sure not to add too much white to it. You can afford to warm it up with more yellow at this point (I use cadmium lemon or Winsor Lemon) instead of adding too much white and making the paint chalky.
When adding lighter green foliage in oil, be sure not to add too much white to it. You can afford to warm it up with more yellow at this point (I use cadmium lemon or Winsor Lemon) because it is sunlit instead of adding too much white and making the paint chalky.

If you are painting in watercolor, the same advice holds and, of course, you would also use more water to lighten the sunlit parts of the foliage. My next blog will cover greens in watercolor.

I’m teaching a three-day intermediate oil workshop at Artists’ Showplace Gallery in Dallas, TX, on January 24-26, 2017, “Back to Basics – the roots of successful painting and how to infuse light into your landscapes.” We will cover lots of light and atmospheric effects to add to your work, which I think are very important aspects of having a painting “stand out from the crowd.” The cost is $285 for the three days and see my web site under “Exhibits and Events” for more information: www.cecyturner.com or go to Artists’ Showplace web site.

I hope you’ve enjoyed this blog post, and stay tuned for the next post about handling these darn summer greens in watercolor!

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